Scott Rathbone

Scott Rathbone

My family and I started attending the Dutton Park Branch in 2011.  With the exception of my oldest son Thomas, the rest of us were new to Taekwondo.  It took me about three months to realise that I was no natural at martial arts and after almost two years not much has changed, but the desire, energy and determination has not wavered.

I am what you would call biomechanically challenged.  There is no hiding from it, my Senior Instructor sees it weekly.  I work on technique but will always come up short.  Weak, too old (did I mention I was 42)or just lazy?   I believe none of these.  I am lucky because I can always counter attack most situations in life with a persistent ‘never say die’ attitude.  Do you ever start something you can’t put down?  I am like that, when I start something and it grabs me you need to stand aside.  I get into this Avatar state frenzy.  I know I have it when I find myself researching something late at night.  It usually starts with finding out the history and for example in the case of Taekwondo – why was it formed in the 1950’s?  Why so many divisions within the one organisation, who are the current champions and masters?  How does it rank against other arts – what’s this linear versus circular form?  Why are there so many similarities between Tai Chi and Taekwondo?  When I start looking into these things I know I am hooked.

Then there are the pre training jitters and that feeling after training – that one you get on the way home when you hear yourself say – I am glad I went to Taekwondo – I feel much better for it.  I also find myself looking for a deeper meaning within the patterns the way they look, the sounds and feelings you get from doing them.  I find some patterns are almost meditative and others are forceful and angry.  I seek constant feedback from first dans and instructors at the branch and at grading and senior training.  Grading for me is stressful but exhilarating.  You have nowhere to hide but so much to learn about yourself and what you have achieved and what is still to be accomplished.  Listen and watch Master Dicks when he gets motivated about Taekwondo.  His words  and actions are not scary or angry, it’s energy and he’s imploring you to lift and be your best.

So what about these biomechanics of mine and how I do the best with what I have got?  For me stretching and flexibility are critical. We normally arrive 30 minutes prior to class to stretch and to make sure I am ready for the class.  Its a time to focus both body and mind.  Talk with the instructor and first dans and ask them about techniques and some of the finer aspects of patterns and moves.  I also keep fit with regular swim, bike and running training, throw in the occasional triathlon or half marathon.  These keep up my cardio fitness, but I know that over doing these will impact that all important flexibility.  Like Taekwondo, I get a real enjoyment from these other activities, a ride up Mt Coot-tha or early run around the river are some of the real pleasures in life.  Watching the sun rise up over the Brisbane River while running over the Story Bridge is pure delight.

So does this ‘never say die‘ attitude ever wane or dim – Yes!  It does for a few reasons.  The obvious is that in life we juggle many things.  Your health will vary because your lacking sleep, not eating right or things like school or work is busy – dare I say stressful.  These things slow you down and your body lets you know.  I feel this when training hard for triathlons – at worst its called fatigue – but its the mind and bodies way of saying slow down.  You need to listen to this.  Also in life if we did the same thing all the time it wouldn’t inspire you much, while consistency in training is good you do need to mix it up.  A break for a short period can be good too – changing your routine in life is a better way of giving you variety.  All these come from an element of trial and error.

There is also that pesky voice in your head – its unfortunately  persistent and can be negative.  It will start about 30 minutes prior to training starting, when your on the couch or just coming home from work,  Its the one that tells you to stay at home because your feeling tired, that show is on, or you feel a little sick… Avoid this by remembering the good things you have achieved, the fact that you now put on a different coloured belt or that great feeling you get after training.   You need to change tack if that voice starts to win, it means you have grown tired and maybe sore from what your doing the goal seems now not that achievable. When you first start to feel this – seek advise on how to modify your expectations and goal setting.

I am not going to be the worlds greatest martial artist – I will  be realistic in the goals I set.  I would be ecstatic if I can do all 10 Taekwondo patterns to the best of my abilities and maybe one day become a black belt.  But thats a goal of lesser importance.  I have other goals which relate to my three sons and their Taekwondo journey,  helping them accomplish their full potential would be even  greater.

In finishing, don’t forget to take time to enjoy the Taekwondo journey or in fact anything that you choose to conquer in life.  There will be spills and thrills along the way just like any pursuit.  Celebrate the milestones and victories and learn from mistakes so you come back stronger.  We must all be grateful and remind ourselves for the things we have by ensuring we make the most of what we‘ve got.